Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Excerpted from online sources

DEA Warns on Fentanyl. Fentanyl is increasingly showing up in heroin, the DEA warned yesterday. The opioid is up to 50 times stronger than heroin, and dealers are using it to increase the potency of their products, but the result can be accidental overdoses. “Drug incidents and overdoses related to fentanyl are occurring at an alarming rate throughout the United States and represent a significant threat to public health and safety,” said DEA administrator Michele Leonhart.

Citing an 80 percent increase in heroin use among Americans between 2007 and 2012, the White House’s Office of National Drug Control Policy recently called for police and fire departments to be prepared to treat heroin overdose victims and for more access to drug treatment.

Illinois Lawmakers File Omnibus Bill to Battle Opiate Addiction. House Assistant Majority Leader Rep. Lou Lang (D) and GOP Rep. John Anthony were set today to file a comprehensive, 240-page bill to deal with heroin and prescription opiate use and addiction. It would allow the overdose reversal drug naloxone to be distributed more widely, require the creation of a drug prevention program for schools, require that coroners report all overdose deaths to the Department of Public Health, require pharmacies to serve as drug “take back” sites, and limit pain reliever prescriptions.

Experts say several things have led to heroin’s widespread use, mostly because it is available, cheap at $5 to $10 in Illinois, and provides an intense high. Also, opiate prescription pain killers have become widely used, providing a gateway for heroin. While not all prescription drug abusers move on to heroin, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration found about 80 percent of heroin users previously used prescription pain relievers. Heroin is a cheap substitute.

FDA to Help Drug Makers Develop Abuse-Deterrent Opiates. “The science of abuse-deterrent medication is rapidly evolving, and the FDA is eager to engage with manufacturers to help make these medications available to patients who need them,” Dr. Margaret A. Hamburg, the FDA’s commissioner, said in a press release. “We feel this is a key part of combating opioid abuse. We have to work hard with industry to support the development of new formulations that are difficult to abuse but are effective and available when needed.” The agency also issued a document called “Guidance for Industry: Abuse-Deterrent Opioids — Evaluation and Labeling,” outlining how future studies can decide whether a new drug has abuse-deterrent properties.

About 23 percent of people who use heroin become dependent on it, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Doctors Are Cutting Back on Prescriptions for Pain Relievers. In a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers report that half of primary care physicians are reducing their prescribing of opiate pain relievers compared to last year and that 85% of doctors believe they are overprescribed. The doctors reported concerns about addiction, overdoses, and traffic accidents. But an even greater number — 90% — were confident in their own ability to correctly prescribe opiates.

A 2012 report by the consortium showed the Chicago metropolitan area ranked first in the country for heroin-related emergency room visits in 2010 ahead of Boston, Detroit, New York and Seattle.

FDA Approves Second Hydrocodone-Only Pain Pill. The Food and Drug Administration has approved Purdue Pharma’s extended-release Hydrocodone tablet Hysingla for use. The agency said Hysingla is designed to be difficult to abuse, but acknowledged it could still be. It is the fourth opioid to be granted abuse-deterrent status, after Purdue’s reformulated Oxycontin, it’s oxycodone-naloxone combo Targiniq, and Pfizer’s morphine-naltrexone combo Embeda. And it is the second hydrocodone-only pill approved by the agency. FDA approved Zohydro in October 2013.

People want to believe heroin is the problem, when the real problem is why people are choosing to use it. “That dramatization of it removes us from understanding the way drug use works,” an expert says. The drama also makes some feel hopeless about recovery. People think they understand treatment, but most get their information from reality shows.

Poll Finds Most See Drug Addiction as Moral Failing. Most Americans consider drug addiction a personal vice rather than a medical condition, according to a new poll from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Respondents were much more likely to approve of helping people with mental illness than with drug addictions, the poll found. “While drug addiction and mental illness are both chronic, treatable health conditions, the American public is more likely to think of addiction as a moral failing than a medical condition,” study leader Colleen Barry, an associate professor in the department of health policy and management, said in a Hopkins news release. “In recent years, it has become more socially acceptable to talk publicly about one’s struggles with mental illness. But with addiction, the feeling is that the addict is a bad or weak person, especially because much drug use is illegal,” she added.

In DuPage County, west of Chicago, a record 45 heroin-related deaths were reported in 2012. The youngest person was 15 and the oldest 64, while nearly half of the deaths were between the ages of 20 and 29.

FDA Responds to Critics on Zohydro. Responding to months of criticism over its decision to approve the prescription opiate pain reliever Zohydro ER, a trio of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials have written a piece in the Journal of the American Medical Association saying approval of the drug was warranted and criticism of the agency was misguided. Concentrating on one drug during a time of heightened concern over opiate misuse does not address the underlying problems of widespread misuse and physician overprescribing, they write. “The problem of opioid overdose demands well-informed policies. The actions taken by FDA may help to reverse the epidemic,” they wrote. “Policies that focus on a single drug can divert focus from broader, further-reaching interventions… The concerns over Zohydro ER should be seen in the greater context of the opioid epidemic. Singling out one drug for restrictions is not likely to be successful.”